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Fish in the Galapagos Islands

The Galapagos Islands are well known for the wide variety of tropical fish that inhabit the colourful coral reefs. The islands are world-renowed as one of the best places in the world for diving and snorkeling giving you the opportunity to observe a number of beautiful, exotic fish. Some of these beautiful fish can be spotted, either while diving or snorkeling or even taking a tour in a glass-bottom boat.

The most common of the Angel fish family, the King Angel Fish (Holocanthus Passer), can be easily identified by its bright yellow tail and white stripe which extends the length of its dark body.

The Flag Cabrilla is a grey/olive fish commonly observed at most dive sites.

There is an abundance of Damselfish including the Yellow-tailed Damselfish (Stegastes arcifrons), the White-tailed Damselfish (Dascyllus aruanus) and the Sergeant Major Fish (Abudefduf Troschelii) which is also a member of the Damselfish family.

Parrotfish are also one of the easiest fish to identify in the Galapagos waters. Surgeon fish such as the Yellow-tailed Surgeon fish and the Purple Surgeonfish, are another guaranteed sighting.

While Angelfish are amongst the most beautiful of tropical fish, the Stonefish is the most deadly with venom powerful enough to kill humans.

There are hundreds of different species of tropical fish found in the waters around the Galapagos Islands. Here is a list of other fish regularly observed in the Galapagos waters:

Starfish
Mexican Hogfish
Pacific Burrfish
Spiny Urchin
Trumpetfish
Guineafowl Puffer Fish
Lizardfish
Sunfish
Cortez Chub
Hieroglyphic Hawkfish
Reef Cornetfish
Filefish
Leopard Flounder
Sunset Wrasse
Black Trigger Fish
Blue Trevally
Glasseye Fish
Leather Bass
Galapagos Blenny
Galapagos clingfish
Galapagos croaker
Galapagos drum
Galapagos blue-banded goby
Galapagos thread herring
Galapagos mullet
Galapagos gurnard
Galapagos razorfish
Galapagos red-lipped batfish
Galapagos jawfish

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